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Special Feature
Vaccination delivery by chain pharmacies in California: Results of a 2007 survey
Tammy Pilisuk, MPH; Jeffery Goad, PharmD, MPH, FCPhA, FCSHP; Howard Backer, MD, MPH
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) 2010;50:134-139. doi:10.1331/JAPhA.2010.09168

Abstract

Objective  To better understand the practice standards and scope of pharmacist-administered vaccination services at chain pharmacies in California.

Design  Cross sectional.

Setting  California in 2006–2007.

Participants  Eight state-level immunization coordinator corporate liaisons to chain pharmacies’ immunization programs.

Intervention  Key informant phone survey with follow-up written survey.

Main outcome measures  Policies, procedures, and vaccine usage.

Results  All eight chains provided immunization services to adults; four chains also vaccinated adolescents. More than 1,000 California pharmacists employed at chain pharmacies have been trained to vaccinate; more than 500 locations participate with evening, weekend, and walk-in hours. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccines were the most common vaccines administered. Other vaccines were used less frequently. Respondents expressed interest in partnering with public health to improve record sharing, build awareness, receive vaccine news updates, and explore other activities.

Conclusion  Chain pharmacies in California have started to vaccinate adults and adolescents—two commonly undervaccinated age groups. To date, patients seeking vaccination at pharmacies are most likely to receive influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. Community locations and extended hours offer patients convenience, although out-of-pocket fees may be a barrier to some patients. Opportunities exist to build and strengthen partnerships among public health, the medical community, and pharmacists in order to vaccinate and protect patients not vaccinated in traditional settings.

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